BELA LAMPERT

Yoga Instructor
Optioned Screenwriter

What is fear?

Fear can be a great obstacle to creativity. Everybody is afraid of something. Of course. We need fear because it can protect us from certain situations that could cause us harm or even our life. But most of the situations we fear are not life-threatening. Not even close. Take one of your fears. Think about it. Just for a moment don't try to get rid of it. Feel it run through your body, try to be clear about what it is exactly that you fear. Maybe you fear not being taken seriously as a writer. It might be something totally different for you, but for the sake of this exercise I'm going to go with this. Now follow that fear for second. If it should become true, what's gonna happen? How would you feel? Investigate those emotions for a bit and then try to think about why you are fearing that situation. Fear is always connected to the love of something else. We fear something because we love something else. What is it that you love and that you fear losing? Maybe you can hold on to that feeling of what you love and now let that feeling of love ran through your body. Again, stay there for a bit and just concentrate on the positive thing now, the thing you love so much that you fear losing it. Now, try to come back to the actual moment, the NOW. You, in this very moment, reading these words. And compare this moment to what you just experienced in...

The value of nothing

Go through your to-do-lists of the last weeks or months. I bet there is something missing on all of them. Nothing. I don’t mean that there is nothing missing, I mean, I bet the word “nothing” is missing on all of them. What do I mean by that? There was a time when I thought the more I can put on my schedule each day and the more I get done the faster I can go forward. But that is flawed thinking. Yes, regular work means progress. To some degree. But the brain can only process so much of it. Let’s take athletes for example. They don’t train the whole day. They train a lot, yes, but they have strict periods of rest. Those periods of rest are the key. Our brain, as well as our body, needs time to process (and sometimes to heal). That processing is only possible if you don’t overload it with new information. Otherwise it’s going to burn out after some time. So? Let go every once in a while. Great ideas and joy in your life can only develop if you let your brain do its work without interference. That’s what those periods of “doing nothing” are for. You need to stop the mind carousel. Stopping the mind carousel:(To get the link to the "Yoga for Writers" Program sign up for my daily emails on this website and check the P.S. section of the Welcome email!) ...

How to write your Way out of the dark Woods

Imagine you're taking a walk in the woods and you try out a new path. One you haven't walked before. At the beginning you like it, but the further you go, the darker it gets, and all of a sudden, all you can see around yourself are trees. A lot of trees. And the path that you came on is gone. You have no idea where to go and you cannot see anything because of all the trees around you. That is the situation a lot of writers put themselves into. They write themselves into a corner by adding trees and trees and trees and then they’re lost. And now what? Well, you try to do the same thing as you would in reality. In order to see something you need to get rid of trees. Luckily, the trees on your page can be cut down easily with a single keystroke. Then, when you got rid of the trees, try to re-create the steps that got you there. At which point did you get lost? Go back step by step until you are back in an area where you know your way around. On the page, that means getting rid of the stuff (at least temporarily) that got you off track. That confused you. You need to go backwards until you’re only left with things of which you know their exact purpose: Why did you put that scene there? Why does this character react like this in that moment? Why did you point to something in the...