BELA LAMPERT

Yoga Instructor
Optioned Screenwriter

FADE IN INDEX CARDS HEADER WEB

Using Index Cards in Fade In for Organizing and Outlining Your Script

How to use Index Cards In Fade In https://youtu.be/DP5kDOvyk7U In this article I'm going to show you how to use Index Cards and synopsises in Fade In for organizing or outlining your script. Fade In gives you the possibility to view all your scenes as Index Cards. This can be very useful for laying out a story before you write it, or for reordering or restructuring purposes. Go to "Document - Index Cards" to get the Index Cards view. Fade In shows you the synopsis of each scene as well as its scene heading. You see, it's very easy to scroll through your scenes, jump to a specific scene, or reorder them in a different sequence. Editing Index Cards You can also have your scene displayed instead of your synopsis. If you want to edit the scene heading, just double click it and change it.  Double click the synopsis to edit it, or click on a card while holding down Control on the PC, Command on the MAC and you get to the scene in the editing view. You can also change the text size of your index cards if you want by right-clicking. Organizing Index Cards Also, you can choose whether you want to have your Index Cards organized according to the Navigator. Check “Navigator Folders” to have Fade In always begin a new line of index cards for each folder or act. ...

Customizing Elements and Additional Formatting in Fade In

Customizing Element Styles in Fade In https://youtu.be/K7_-sN-gha4 In this article I'll show you how you can modify the preset element styles if that's what you want to do. Almost all aspects of the built-in element styles can be modified, however, if you like to add completely new ones you can do so as well. Custom element styles are saved along with the document you're actually using. If you no longer need them you can delete them of course. You cannot delete the built-in element styles though. Change Element Style attributes To change the existing element styles or create new ones go to “Format - Element Styles”. For built-in as well as for custom element styles, you can change the following: the namethe font, including face, size, and formattingIndentationAlignmentthe spacing before the paragraphthe line spacing within the paragraphand whether a paragraph of this element needs to begin on a new page If you set an element to be an act break, it will end any current scene. You need to keep that in mind for numbering, for example. You can also change on which element style each element is based, also, which element style will be next when you press ENTER or TAB. Additional Formatting Besides using elements for formatting you can also use the usual formatting tools on the right side of the screen for underlining, bold, italic and strikethrough. Also, the usual buttons for left, center and right alignment are exactly where you'd expect them. Highlighting You have several colors to choose from if you want to highlight text. Go to “Format - Highlighting”. You can...

Fade In Formatting of Elements Web

How to use Formatting Elements in Fade In

Formatting Elements in Fade In In this article I'm going to demonstrate what kind of screenplay formatting elements Fade In uses to take care of the screenplay formatting for you, and how you can use them quickly and easily. Screenplay Format If you look at a finished screenplay you see that all the different elements have a specific kind of formatting, meaning where your Character names are, how much your dialogue is indented, and all that kind of stuff. While you're writing, you don't need to worry about all of that. Fade In uses pre-set formatting elements and will jump from one to the other just the way you need it in almost all cases. Let's see how this works. Jumping through Elements with TAB and ENTER Let's create a new screenplay by going to "File - New". Now because the first thing you're going to write will be a scene header, Fade In's formatting is set to "Scene Heading" already. You see this in the Format panel in the top right corner. So, let's type something, for example "INT. GARAGE - DAY". If you hit ENTER, Fade In jumps to the next line and as you can see the formatting is automatically set to "Action". Because most likely the next thing you're going to write will be an action line. So, let's do that. Let's type, "A lovely spring day." Now, this is maybe not a great opening action line but it servers its purpose.  Now, if you hit ENTER again, Fade In jumps to the next line, assuming you...

why arguing too much might hurt your inspiration

They Just Don’t Get It

They Just Don't Get It I had a discussion with someone yesterday. It was basically about the fine line between self care and pushing yourself to produce creative output. It wasn’t a bad discussion at all but at some point I realized that the other person just didn’t get my point. He said he did, but it was clear to me that he didn’t. Maybe I didn’t explain it well enough, but maybe what I was trying to say just doesn’t exist in his world. This happens quite frequently. And often we confuse discussions with having to persuade the other people of our opinion, which is not the case. And not the point of this email. The point is that you argue from your perspective with the life experience you have. And that’s exactly what happened in the discussion I had. I argued from a perspective of having gotten through an experience that gave me a different view of things. And - in my biased, subjective view - apparently that wasn’t the case for the other person, so it would be appropriate to say that this point of view simply didn’t exist in the world of the other person.  And therefore that person couldn’t see my argument. The outcome? None. I said everything I could say on the topic and that was it. What was nice after the discussion, the other person got back to me over messenger (the discussion happened on a video call) and apologized to me because he thought he was too harsh on me. Which he wasn’t. We just had...

Fade In User Interface Header Web

Getting Around In Fade In – The User Interface

Fade In User Interface You can watch this article as video: https://youtu.be/NqOXjpiu3Dg In this article I’ll give you a tour around the Fade In user interface and I’ll, including how to use the navigator and how to order or structure your scenes. What you see here is the general page-layout view Fade In presents your script in. This is exactly what your script will look like once it’s printed: Let’s have a look at how you can move around in your script. To jump to a specific page, use "Edit - Go To" and enter the page or scene number you want to go to. You also get the standard search functions, with "Edit - Find", and of course you also have a "Find and Replace" tool here. You can also search for highlighted text and notes. Go to "Format - Highlighting" to jump to the next highlighted text, or "Document - Notes" to jump to the next note. The Navigator One of the areas you will be using quite often is the navigator on the lower right side of the screen. The Navigator is a quick and convenient tool to get around in your script and to rename or rearrange scenes. ENTER or double click lets you jump to the corresponding scene in your script.  Synopsis Use right click on a scene in the Navigator for cutting and pasting scenes, or adding and changing its synopsis. A synopsis is a short description or summary of your scene, where you can sum up what happens in just a few short sentences. You could also add a...

How to stay inspired in the wake of unfortunate events

Here Comes The Lesson

Not everything goes according to our plans all the time. Every now and then something happens that seems to be a setback, a failure, a bad turn of events, call it what you want. It’s one of those things that worry us because they don’t fit our fantasy of how things should go. This can be a rejection of a project of yours, maybe even after it looked so good and it went forward very well. Or a sudden change of circumstances at your workplace that you don’t like. A fight with a friend. Encountering unexpected story problems that seem to pull everything in question. Whatever it might be, our usual reaction might be to react very negatively to that event. To complain, be angry about the circumstances, maybe even blame someone. But very often (I’m not saying in 100% of the cases, although we probably will never know) these things either turn out to be positive in some way because the change leads us to a better place, or at least we learn something valuable through it. Or, maybe the problem resolves itself quicker and easier than we first thought, which makes all the anger and energy spent on complaining absolutely useless. It’s a good emotional exercise to try to see seemingly unfortunate turns of events as just what they are: changes circumstances nothing more. The negative aspect about them comes from our mind racing forward to the future and expecting that something bad will come out of this. So, don’t let it. Accept the change and see where it...

Final Draft 12 Header and Footers - Header

Headers and Footers in Final Draft 12

How to Customize Headers and Footers in Final Draft 12 Headers and Footers in Final Draft can hold additional information that is important, depending on the kind of screen- or stageplay you are writing. The most common use of information in the header is maybe the scene number, but there are a bunch of other fields that you can add. Let’s take a look how it works. To access the header and footer setup go to Document - Header and Footer. You get three tabs here. One for the header information, one for the footer information, and one for the options. The different fields for script information are the same for the header and the footer and you can choose which one you want to add where, if at all. Customizing the Header If we take a closer look at the header setup, we see that there are three sections: LeftMiddleRight You can either just click in the area where you want to add or change certain fields, or, in case this window is empty, you can jump to the next part with tab. The buttons with the fields you can add to the header and the footer are at the top of the window. If you want to add one of those, just select the position where you want to insert that information with your curser, and click the respective button. Final Draft will add a field that will be display the correct information on the script page. To delete fields, just place the cursor at the right side of the field...

how to maintain balance instead of falling off again

Stick To Your Own Rules

Stick To Your Own Rules A couple of years ago I had a rough time. I couple of things happened in my life that led me into emotional turmoil and it was of little surprise that this started to affect my health soon. I was exhausted and I needed to take care of myself. So, I did that. I abandoned all unnecessary things for a while (also writing to be honest - at least for some time) and my only focus was on regaining strength and getting my life into balance again. And over time it worked. I feel much better now and I am a way happier person also. Going through all that made me learn a couple of important lessons about life and about myself. And while I could go on talking about several of those things at length, there’s a specific point I want to talk about today. Because when we feel unwell, it’s kind of easy to realize that self-care is necessary and we understand that we need to focus on that. Because the pain is big enough. But after some time when we get better, we tend to forget about all that (which in part is good because it doesn’t help anyone carrying around bad feelings forever), and we start to lose our balance again. When we feel good it’s tempting to abandon our diet plans, do less exercise, overextend ourselves again, fall back into the same bad habits we had before. And in part that’s normal.  Maintaining equilibrium doesn’t come without effort. If you try to balance...

Final Draft screenplay formatting - choose time of day

Final Draft 12 Screenplay Formatting Elements

Final Draft 12 Screenplay Formatting Elements In this article we’ll look at the different screenplay elements that we’ve already seen before and see how to create them and jump from element to element quickly to keep in the writing flow. Most screenplay writing programs, and Final Draft is no exception, mainly use two keys to jump between the different script elements while writing. That’s ENTER, and TAB. Let’s see how that works. We have an empty page here, so the first thing we need to create is a scene heading. We already saw that a scene heading needs to consist of three elements minimum: EXT. Or INT., the location, and the time of day. So let’s try that. Just press the “E” key. Final Draft automatically offers to type “EXT.” Because it knows that at the beginning of a scene heading you most likely will want to write either “EXT.” Or “INT.”.  These pre-determined text entries are stores in so-called “Smart Lists” that can also individually be customized. If you want to know more about that check out the video about Smart Type. Now we can either continue to write “EXT.” Or just press TAB, and Final Draft will complete the suggestion by itself and waits for our next entry, the location. Let’s type something, for example, “GARAGE”. TAB again, Final Draft automatically creates the dash that is standard in between the location and time of day and asks us which time of day we want to use. We can either choose or write, but before you do that let’s take a look...

Final Draft Go To Tool

Moving Around In Your Script In Final Draft 12

Moving Around In Your Script In Final Draft 12 In this article we'll look at how you can quickly find or jump to certain sections in your screenplay. Let's suppose you've already written quite a lot of, at some point you'll have to jump to specific sections or find specific information quickly. Since it would use up a lot of your writing time to search through all of your scenes to find that specific place there is a tool that you can use. The so-called “Go to” tool. Final Draft gives you two possibilities to access that. Either through the menu via Edit - Go To or you can click on the button at the bottom of the screen where it says, "No Scene" (or "Scene X" with a number if you have scene numbering turned on). There are several possibilities to choose from in the drop down menu, but for now let's focus on page and scene. If you choose page you can enter a page number and by clicking "go" you will jump directly to that page. You can also use the "next" and "previous" buttons to jump pages forwards or backwards. If you choose scene you can jump through the scenes with "next" and "previous". In case your scenes have numbers, and you know the number of the scene you want to jump to, just enter the number and click “go”. To get more information on how to number scene or use the other elements that you can use here in the drop down menu in order...