BELA LAMPERT

Yoga Instructor
Optioned Screenwriter

You haven’t written today

There are days when you don't feel like writing. This might be for different reasons. Every now and then it's good to take a day or two to recharge your batteries and make sure you don't burn out. Maintaining your energy level is a very important part of being and staying creative. On the other hand, not feeling like writing can also be procrastination. Maybe you are pushing it aside for some reason and you label it as "taking care of yourself" when in fact it's just avoidance. A while ago John August and Craig Mazin talked about this on the “Scriptnotes” screenwriting podcast. Under the name “Tough Love vs. Self-Care", Craig made an interesting point about the distinction between the two: He says that self-care and also pushing through when it is necessary are both positive things that can give you good results. The problem is that those can also hide negative emotions that lie beneath that. Tough love often masquerades as self-loathing and self-care might in fact be “fear and withdrawal and a sense that engaging isn't worth it.” This is an important distinction. It’s okay to let go of writing every now and then, and it’s okay to push through when necessary. Just make sure you’re clear about your emotions and what stands behind them. Get clear about emotions that such your creativity away: P.S.: The link to the transcription of the “Scriptnotes” Episode:(To get the link to the "Yoga for Writers" Program sign up for my daily emails on this website and...

It never stops

How does this situation sound to you: You’re sitting at your desk, writing, and somehow the ideas don’t flow as well as you wish they would. You’ve got SOME ideas, but nothing new or exciting. All of it just feels like hard work and you drift off to thinking, “why am I still not where I want to be?” “How much longer will it take?” Sound familiar? We've all been there. Or at least, I have. And then I made a mind switch. Because if I would have continued like that, mentally bickering about not being where I want to be in every writing session, this would have been disastrous for my creativity. And also, I realized that it takes away my joy of writing, which I used to have when I started out. Now, I'm aware that writing is a lifelong process, a journey without end goal. If I look back to when I started writing, there was a time where I wished I knew what I know now. And if I don't stop, there will always be something new to learn and discover in the future. What has changed is my measurement. Before, I tried to reach certain goals. I thought when I would reach them, everything will be better. But at the point of reaching that goal, my mind had already set out a new one and I thought, "oh, when I reach that new goal, then finally everything is going to be better." But it never stops. That's why my measurement is different...

This is what’s going to happen

The things you worry about will not happen. And if they do happen someone will help you. And if nobody will help you you will find another solution. And if you don't find another solution it will be fine. You'll find out that it’s good that everything happened that way. Just at an earlier time you couldn't see it. Or, what happened is just the setup for something brilliant, something fortunate, that is going to happen to you. Something that couldn’t have happened without a certain “mishap” before that. Moral of the story? Worrying steals your happiness and shuts down your creativity. Try not to let it happen too much! How to stop worrying:(To get the link to the "Yoga for Writers" Program sign up for my daily emails on this website and check the P.S. section of the Welcome email!) ...

Is the cure worse than the illness?

Imagine this: You are an aspiring writer with a day job. You need the job to keep yourself afloat but it stresses you out and that affects your creativity in your writing time. I don't know if this is your exact situation that my guess would be that you can relate in some way. Now let's say, having too little time to write that is free of mental distractions (a.k.a. the stress from your day job) is the "disease". It is something that you would like to cure, right? What possible cures would there be? The most obvious in a hypothetical sense would be to quit your day job. Without your day job you have enough time to write, and there is no stress from people at work that affects your creativity. But, all you might do is exchange one disease for another. Without a day job you will be stressed out because you have no income, no way to pay your bills, your mortgage,… and that stress also affects your creativity in your writing time. You have cured your initial disease but the cure turns out to be worse. Find out what the "diseases" of your day. Brainstorm possibilities to cure them, in a hypothetical way first, and then evaluate your possibilities and compare them to your original "disease". Which of them is better? Maybe what you considered a "disease" in the first place is not such a bad spot to be in, at least for the moment. More creativity cures:(To get the link to the "Yoga for Writers"...

The Kobe Mentality

The Mamba Mentality is all about focusing on the process and trusting in the hard work when it matters most. - Kobe Bryant, 1978 - 2020 “At the end of my career I want to be known as a talented over-achiever. I was blessed with talent, but I worked as if I had none.” To find your own power:(To get the link to the "Yoga for Writers" Program sign up for my daily emails on this website and check the P.S. section of the Welcome email!) ...