BELA LAMPERT

Yoga Instructor
Optioned Screenwriter

Final Draft 12 Header and Footers - Header

Headers and Footers in Final Draft 12

How to Customize Headers and Footers in Final Draft 12 Headers and Footers in Final Draft can hold additional information that is important, depending on the kind of screen- or stageplay you are writing. The most common use of information in the header is maybe the scene number, but there are a bunch of other fields that you can add. Let’s take a look how it works. To access the header and footer setup go to Document - Header and Footer. You get three tabs here. One for the header information, one for the footer information, and one for the options. The different fields for script information are the same for the header and the footer and you can choose which one you want to add where, if at all. Customizing the Header If we take a closer look at the header setup, we see that there are three sections: LeftMiddleRight You can either just click in the area where you want to add or change certain fields, or, in case this window is empty, you can jump to the next part with tab. The buttons with the fields you can add to the header and the footer are at the top of the window. If you want to add one of those, just select the position where you want to insert that information with your curser, and click the respective button. Final Draft will add a field that will be display the correct information on the script page. To delete fields, just place the cursor at the right side of the field...

Final Draft screenplay formatting - choose time of day

Final Draft 12 Screenplay Formatting Elements

Final Draft 12 Screenplay Formatting Elements In this article we’ll look at the different screenplay elements that we’ve already seen before and see how to create them and jump from element to element quickly to keep in the writing flow. Most screenplay writing programs, and Final Draft is no exception, mainly use two keys to jump between the different script elements while writing. That’s ENTER, and TAB. Let’s see how that works. We have an empty page here, so the first thing we need to create is a scene heading. We already saw that a scene heading needs to consist of three elements minimum: EXT. Or INT., the location, and the time of day. So let’s try that. Just press the “E” key. Final Draft automatically offers to type “EXT.” Because it knows that at the beginning of a scene heading you most likely will want to write either “EXT.” Or “INT.”.  These pre-determined text entries are stores in so-called “Smart Lists” that can also individually be customized. If you want to know more about that check out the video about Smart Type. Now we can either continue to write “EXT.” Or just press TAB, and Final Draft will complete the suggestion by itself and waits for our next entry, the location. Let’s type something, for example, “GARAGE”. TAB again, Final Draft automatically creates the dash that is standard in between the location and time of day and asks us which time of day we want to use. We can either choose or write, but before you do that let’s take a look...

Final Draft Go To Tool

Moving Around In Your Script In Final Draft 12

Moving Around In Your Script In Final Draft 12 In this article we'll look at how you can quickly find or jump to certain sections in your screenplay. Let's suppose you've already written quite a lot of, at some point you'll have to jump to specific sections or find specific information quickly. Since it would use up a lot of your writing time to search through all of your scenes to find that specific place there is a tool that you can use. The so-called “Go to” tool. Final Draft gives you two possibilities to access that. Either through the menu via Edit - Go To or you can click on the button at the bottom of the screen where it says, "No Scene" (or "Scene X" with a number if you have scene numbering turned on). There are several possibilities to choose from in the drop down menu, but for now let's focus on page and scene. If you choose page you can enter a page number and by clicking "go" you will jump directly to that page. You can also use the "next" and "previous" buttons to jump pages forwards or backwards. If you choose scene you can jump through the scenes with "next" and "previous". In case your scenes have numbers, and you know the number of the scene you want to jump to, just enter the number and click “go”. To get more information on how to number scene or use the other elements that you can use here in the drop down menu in order...

Final Draft Bookmarks - Manage Bookmarks

Bookmarks in Final Draft 12

Bookmarks in Final Draft 12 In this lesson we'll learn how to use bookmarks so you can easily mark certain places in your script that you might want to refer to more often. The bookmark principle is the same as in most other software packages or even with books really. You just place the bookmark where you want it to be to find a specific place in your script quickly. It’s really easy. Go to the place where you want to insert your bookmark. Then go to "Insert - Bookmark". Give it a name, for example "Act II". Now you can jump directly to that bookmark via the “Go to“ tool under Edit - Go to...

Final Draft Labels - Header Label Shows Up

Creating Labels in Final Draft 12

Creating Labels in Final Draft 12 In this article we'll have a look at labels. Labels are something that is not needed regularly by writers, it's mostly for television shows, but you should be able to create them in case you need them. Some theatre or TV scripts need certain information in their header section that shows for example what page belongs to which act. For this, you can create Labels in Final Draft that print that information. Each Label on each page is used until you create another one. So, for example, if you create a new Label on page 13 and another one on page 25, the Label you created on page 13 is used for all subsequent pages until page 24. After that, the Label you created for page 25 is used. How to create labels To create a Label place the cursor at the top of the page and go to "Insert - Label". Enter the name of the Label. Now, if you do that the label you placed might still not show up in the header. This is because you have to tell the header to include the label and show the field on the page. To do this, go to Document - Header and Footer and place the label field in the header where you want it. For more information on how to use the header and footer fields go to the “Header and Footer” article. Once you placed the label field in the header you will see it show up at the top of...

Final Draft 12 Beat Board and Outline Editor

Using The Final Draft 12 Beat Board And Outline Editor

Using The Final Draft 12 Beat Board And Outline Editor You can watch this article as video: https://youtu.be/ekl6FJqhST0 Final Draft 12 has some major updates on the beat board and it works slightly different than in version 11.  So, let’s see what the version 12 Beat Board can do, no matter if you’ve worked with version 11 before or not. If you open up Final Draft 12 there should be a Beat Board button right on the toolbar. Just click that and the beat board opens up. For purposes of this demonstration I’m using the Final Draft sample script that is included. Just go to Help - Sample Scripts to open it. Outline Editor The first major difference that you see is that the story map from version 11 has been replaced with the so-called Outline Editor. You get two rows to place outline elements here, Outline 1 and Outline 2. We’ll look at how that exactly works in a second. You can make the Outline Editor bigger or smaller if you click drag at the bottom edge. Creating Beats You already see sample beats here on the Beat Boards. These cards that you see are all beats. There are no more structure points like in version 11 because they are not necessary anymore. You also see that you can use beat cards for sections so to speak, like here with the Acts and for outline elements that contain some information, like all the rest of the cards. In order to create new beat cards, right click and select “New Beat” or just double click on an...

Final Draft 12 Review

Final Draft 12 Review – Should I Upgrade?

Final Draft 12 Review - Should I Upgrade? https://youtu.be/qGitsTKcYNw Hi, this is Bela from the Writer’s Territory, and guess what, Final Draft just has come out with a new version, version 12.  Which means, of course, I have to test it and let you know what I think of it. And just glancing over the improvements real quickly, seems like they’ve finally added some great features that I’ve been waiting for a long time. Let’s see if they deliver what they promise. Here are the most important updates from version 11. Beat Board They worked a lot on the beat board and it really has some nice additions that will help you use it more effectively and more flexible than before. Let me show you. Flow Lines Now you can create relationships between beats on the beat board. This helps you to have a better overview of the relationship between the cards. You can connect them with lines or arrows if you drag them on top of each other, or select them and them connect them via the right click menu. You can also change the color of the connections. Realtime Collaboration Version 11 of Final Draft already had live collaboration on the script itself. Now, in version 12 you also can collaborate on ScriptNotes and on the Beat Board. Sadly I can’t show you this in real time collaboration mode right now because at this moment I’ve only one machine at my disposal, but the collaboration works the same way as in version 11, just that now you can collaborate not only on the script, but also...

Final Draft 12 - Find And Replace

“Find and Replace” in Final Draft 12

"Find and Replace" in Final Draft 12 Apart from the “Search Tool”, which is discussed in another article, Final Draft has another tool for when you just want to search for a certain word and character name. And this tool is the "Find and Replace". If you've used a find and replace tool in another text editor, you'll quickly become familiar with this one. It works pretty much the same way, except that it adds the possibility to include certain screenplay related elements. Let's see what it does. Go to “Edit - Find...

Final Draft SmartType List Example

Speed Up Your Writing With Final Draft 12’s “SmartType”

Speed Up Your Writing With Final Draft 12's "SmartType" In this article we’re going to have a look at SmartType lists and how they can speed up your writing by automatically filling in elements that you’re using on a regular basis in your script. As you might know, Final Draft 12 gives you suggestions when typing certain standard script elements that are used often. To see for which types of elements Final Draft 12 can create with SmartType lists, go to Document - SmartType. Here in the “lists” tab you see which elements have automatically been added by Final Draft: CharactersExtensionsScene IntrosLocationsTimesTransitions In each of those categories you can manually add new SmartType entries by clicking the “New” button. “Rebuild” scans the whole script for entries that only appear in that script. It rebuilds the whole SmartType list for you based on the information in your script. Final Draft 12 gives you many SmartType entries from the start that are common, for example “EXT.”, “INT.”, “DAY, “NIGHT”, and others. Then, while you’re writing, Final Draft 12 automatically fills these lists with the information you type. “Alphabetize” sorts your elements in alphabetical order. It does not delete or add any information. To delete an entry, for example if you find typos in your SmartType lists, hit the “Delete” button. Options There are a couple of options that help you adjust SmartType list behaviour to your preferences. Matching Characters, Scene Headings, or Transitions:  If you deactivate this function, Final Draft 12 will not show you the SmartType selection window in your script when typing one of...

Final Draft Macros

Using Macros In Final Draft 12 To Speed Up Your Writing

Using Macros In Final Draft 12 To Speed Up Your Writing In this article we’re going to have a look at Macros. This is another method to speed up your writing process because Macros can create script elements more quickly than having to type them every time you need them. Macros are essentially shortcuts that create commonly used text elements for you. To open the macro window go to “Document - Macros”. What you find is a list of pre-defined macros with the related keyboard shortcut. The name of the Macro is defined in the bar up top. The name of the Macro is shown in the list below with the corresponding shortcut. The Macro Text defines the text that is inserted when this Macro is triggered. The Macro Element dropdown menu defines which element a certain Macro belongs to. For example, if you use a Macro that fills in “INT.” For you, you will want that to be a scene heading element. “Transition to” defines what element is being created after having activated this macro. This can be “none” if you want to continue typing in the current element after having used that Macros, or you can define another script element that Final Draft 12 will jump to after having inserted the Macro text. Let’s see how that works. If you use a macro in the middle of a text block the macro will not trigger where your cursor is right now but rather insert the macro at the end of the text block. So if you want to...